2017

  • The new 245,000 square-foot research facility Biomedical Sciences Partnership Building (BSPB) will open on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus (PBC) with wet laboratories specialized for cell biology, molecular and biochemical investigations, cores to include flow cytometry/immunology, microscopy, histology, biorepository/tissue culture in support of funded research and new projects.BSPB
  • 531 volunteer/community faculty.

2016

  • May 10 – 66 students graduate.
  • February – LCME grants College of Medicine - Phoenix Provisional accreditation, an intermediate step towards receiving full accreditation.

2015

2014

  • In August 2014, the Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) voted to authorize discussions to combine the University of Arizona Health Network and Banner Health to create a long-time partnership with the UA Colleges of Medicine. This primary clinical partnership represents a powerful opportunity for the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix to expand and enhance its education, research and patient care.
  • May 12 – 37 students graduate.

2013

  • The economic impact of the overall biomedical campus in downtown Phoenix in 2013 was nearly $1.3 billion, of which $961 million is attributed to the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix presence.
  • July – the first class of students begin at the College of Medicine - Phoenix (separately accredited).
  • May 8 – 50 students graduate.
  • The University of Arizona, home to Arizona's only MD-granting medical program, establishes its second, separately accredited medical school in downtown Phoenix - the first ever MD-granting medical school in the city.

2012

  • October 2012, the Health Sciences Education Building opened. The state-of-the-art building is a six-story facility with lecture halls, the Center for Simulation and Innovation, clinical education units, an anatomy lab, offices and various flexible classrooms.
  • July – class size increased to 80 students admitted per year.
  • July – LCME Grants preliminary accreditation to the College of Medicine - Phoenix and allows the college to recruit applicants and enroll students.
  • HSEBMay 9 – 40 medical students graduate.
  • A portable rapid DNA analysis technology that can sample and match a DNA profile to a secure national law enforcement database is developed by the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix's Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine.
  • Gholam Peyman, MD, faculty member at the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix, is awarded the "National Medal of Technology and Innovation" by President Obama for the invention of the LASIK surgical technique, expanding the field of retinal surgery.

2011

  • First class of 24 medical students graduate.

2010

  • Citing financial concerns, Arizona State University formally withdrew from the partnership with the University of Arizona College of Medicine in April 2010. The Arizona Board of Regents (ABOR) approved the change on May 1, 2010, giving the University of Arizona full responsibility for operations at the downtown Phoenix campus.
  • Compression-only CPR, a technique created by UA College of Medicine – Phoenix faculty member, Ben Bobrow, MD, is nationally recognized as more effective.

2009

  • Stuart Flynn, MDAugust – class size increased to 48 students admitted per year.

2008

  • Stuart Flynn, MD, named founding dean of the Phoenix program (May 2008 - April 2016). Dean Flynn led the efforts for separate accreditation for Phoenix program.

2007

  • October 2007 – The University of Arizona expands its research presence on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus by opening the Arizona Biomedical
    Collaborative Building with Arizona State University.
  • On August 10, 2007, the college's inaugural class of 24 students held their White Coat Ceremony.
  • Edward Shortliffe, MD, PhD, named dean (Mar 2007 - April 2008).Former Dean Shortliffe
  • February – LCME approves the College of Medicine’s plan to expand Phoenix to a four-year educational track. 
  • The College opened its doors as a four-year branch campus, admitting its inaugural class of 24 students.

2006

  • October – opening and dedication of the beautifully restored historic buildings, formerly Phoenix Union High School (built in 1911).

2005

  • On May 20, 2005, House Bill 2768 was signed by the governor appropriating $6 million for the UA College of Medicine – Phoenix.
  • Renovations begin on the historic buildings.

2004

  • Third Street and Indian SchoolIn December, TGen opens state-of-the-art facilities on the Phoenix Biomedical Campus.
  • On August 4, 2004, the Arizona Board of Regents approved an agreement to expand the operations of the College to a four-year program - an unprecedented statewide collaboration of the ABOR, three state universities, the City of Phoenix, the Translational Genomics Research Institute (TGen) and Phoenix-area teaching hospitals. Guided by a governor-appointed commission, this led to the establishment of the Phoenix Biomedical Campus in downtown Phoenix. The property was provided by the City of Phoenix, and historic buildings were extensively renovated, ultimately becoming home to the college and its PBC partners.
  • In July 2004, ABOR President Gary Stuart convened a meeting between himself, University of Arizona President Peter Likins and Arizona State University President Michael Crow to discuss a MOU that would create a four-year program between the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix in collaboration with Arizona State University.
  • City of Phoenix and Board of Regents agree on lease for UA College of Medicine - Phoenix buildings.

1994

  • In December, the college opened UA space in an office complex at Third Street and Indian School and moved from the Maricopa County Medical Society building.

1992

  • A Phoenix program was officially established, allowing third- and fourth-year Tucson-based UA College of Medicine students to complete rotations at affiliated hospitals in Phoenix.
  • July 1, 1992, the college opened a 300 sq ft office at the Maricopa County Medical Society building. The office began with the appointment of Jacqueline A. Chadwick, MD, a well-known family practice physician, as Associate Dean for the Phoenix Programs and an administrative assistant.
  • Dr. Jackie Chadwick250 volunteer/community faculty.

1991

  • One-third of the UA College of Medicine students spent a portion of their third year in Phoenix.

1983

  • Medical students at the UA College of Medicine were taking required clerkships in internal medicine, pediatrics, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology, and family practice, as well as clinical electives in the Phoenix area.