Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD
Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD (Photo Credit: Contemporary OB/GYN)

Contemporary OB/GYN

Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD
Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD (Photo Credit: Contemporary OB/GYN)
Exploring the Connection Between Endometriosis and the Gut Microbiome

Although bacteria are altered in endometriosis, there is no definitive consensus on specific microbiota compositions linked to the disease, according to a review in Human Reproduction Update.

However, bacterial vaginosis-associated bacteria and lactobacillus depletion in the cervicovaginal microbiome are associated with endometriosis and infertility in the majority of included studies.

“We want to encourage more robust microbiome research for endometriosis because it is an incredibly burdensome condition that warrants additional attention and research,” said senior author Melissa Herbst-Kralovetz, PhD, director of the Women’s Health Research Program and Microbiome Initiative at the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix.

About the College

Founded in 2007, the University of Arizona College of Medicine – Phoenix inspires and trains exemplary physicians, scientists and leaders to optimize health and health care in Arizona and beyond. By cultivating collaborative research locally and globally, the college accelerates discovery in a number of critical areas — including cancer, stroke, traumatic brain injury and cardiovascular disease. Championed as a student-centric campus, the college has graduated 669 physicians, all of whom received exceptional training from nine clinical partners and more than 2,600 diverse faculty members. As the anchor to the Phoenix Bioscience Core, which is projected to have an economic impact of $3.1 billion by 2025, the college prides itself on engaging with the community, fostering education, inclusion, access and advocacy.