Christopher Glembotski, PhD
Professor, Department of Internal Medicine
Director, Translational Cardiovascular Research Center
Associate Dean, Research
cglembotski@email.arizona.edu

Christopher Glembotski, PhD

Brief Bio

Christopher Glembotski, PhD, is a renowned researcher in cardiovascular disease with a remarkable background and a wide-range of accomplishments not only as a scientist, but as an educator and leader. He is the inaugural director of the Translational Cardiovascular Research Center; the associate dean for Research; and a professor in the Department of Internal Medicine.

Prior to joining the college, Dr. Glembotski served as the director of the San Diego State University (SDSU) Heart Institute and was a distinguished professor of biology. Dr. Glembotski has an extensive research background and garnered more than $35 million in grants during his time at SDSU. Since he started his own lab in 1983, he has been continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Glembotski has been recognized as an educator and researcher with several accolades that include receiving the American Heart Association Established Investigator Award, the Albert W. Johnson Research Lectureship Award and being named Distinguished Professor of Biology in 2019 — SDSU’s highest research honor.

His research centers around the area of molecular cardiology, with a focus on identifying new therapeutics for treating ischemic and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies.

Dr. Glembotski earned a bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo, CA, and a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of California, Los Angeles. He continued his studies at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver as a postdoctoral fellow in molecular physiology and moved to his first faculty position as professor of pharmacology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia before relocating to San Diego to become director of the SDSU Heart Institute.